Faculty of Engineering

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

 

 

1.0       GENERAL INFORMATION

MISSION OF THE UNIVERSITY

Through its teaching, research and innovative activities, the Edo University, Iyamho, is poised to be a major contributor to the advancement of knowledge, wisdom and understanding for the benefit of the university in encouraging and promoting scholarship and will relate its activities to social, cultural and economic needs of the people of Edo State in particular, Nigeria and the world in general.

 

Basic Admission Requirements and Expected Duration of The Programmes

 

The basic admission requirements for the Departments in the Faculty of Engineering shall include:

 

2.1       Admission Requirements for UTME

The minimum admission requirement for Engineering disciplines are passes at credit level in the Senior Secondary School final year examination or GCE ‘O’ Level in five subjects including Mathematics, English Language, Physics and Chemistry.  Candidates are also required to have acceptable pass in the UTME. 

 

2.2       Admission Requirements for Direct Entry

For Direct Entry, candidates must have passes in Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry at GCE ‘A’ level or equivalent.  Holders of OND and HND at minimum of upper credit level are eligible for consideration for admission into 200 and 300 levels respectively.

 

2.3       Minimum Duration

The minimum duration for any programme in the Faculty of Engineering is five academic sessions for candidates who enter through the UTME.  Candidates who enter through the Direct Entry will spend a minimum of four academic sessions provided that they satisfy all the other University requirements.

 

2.4       Name of Programmes with Degree in View

Programme:  

  1. Chemical Engineering (B. Eng.)
  2. Civil Engineering (B. Eng.)
  3. Computer Engineering (B. Eng.)
  4. Electrical and Electronic Engineering (B. Eng.)
  5. Mechanical Engineering (B. Eng.)

 

2.5       GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Students must pass all the core and required courses, as well.  Each student is also to present individual project and also defend it during the oral examinations.

 

2.5.1    Degree Classifications

The determination of the class of degree shall be based on the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) earned at the end of the programme.  The GPA is computed by dividing the total number of credit points (TCP) by the total number of units (TNU) for all the courses taken in the semester.  The CGPA shall be used in the determination of the class of degree as summarized in Table 1.

 

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

Class of Degree

4.50 – 5.00

3.50 – 4.49

2.40 – 3.49

1.50 – 2.39

First Class (Hons.)

2nd Class Upper (Hons.)

2nd Class Lower (Hons.)

3rd Class (Hons.)

Table 1: Degree Classification

  

The maximum length of time allowed to obtain a degree in any Department in the Faculty of Engineering shall be fourteen semesters for the 5-year degree programme and twelve semesters for students admitted directly into 200 level.  For extension beyond the maximum period, a special permission of Senate shall be required on the recommendation of the Faculty Board.

 

2.5.2    Weighting System:

 

The Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of a student can be determined by the addition of the Grade Point (GP) at each level taking into consideration the weighting percentage. To calculate the final class of degree for students, the following weighting system shall apply as shown in Table 2.

 

                        Table 2: Weighting System

S/N

LEVEL

5 YEARS

(UTME)

4 YEARS (DIRECT ENTRY)

1.

100

10%

-

2.

200

15%

10%

3.

300

20%

20%

4.

400

25%

30%

5.

500

30%

40%

 

2.5.3. Withdrawal: A student whose Cumulative Grade Point Average is below 2.00 at the end of a particular year of study (from 100 level to 400 level) shall be advised to withdraw from the Department. A student shall be allowed to register for courses at the next higher level only after registering failed courses first. No student is allowed to register more than 50 credit units per session. Also the pre-requisite courses for the higher level courses must have been passed.

 

2.5.4.   Course Credit System

All Engineering programmes are run on a modularized system, commonly referred to as Course Unit System. All courses are therefore sub-divided into more or less self-sufficient and logically consistent packages that are taught within a semester and examined at the end of that particular semester.  Credit weights should be attached to each course.  One credit is equivalent to one hour per week per semester of 15 weeks of lectures or 2 hours of tutorials or 3 hours per week of laboratory/studio work per semester of 15 weeks.

 

2.5.5.   Grade Point Average and Cumulative Grade Point Average

Grading of courses shall be done by a combination of percentage marks and letter grades translated into a graduated system of Grade Point Equivalents (GPE).  For the purpose of determining a student’s standing at the end of every semester, the Grade Point Average (GPA) system shall be used.  The GPA is computed by dividing the total number of credit points (TCP) by the total number of units (TNU) for all the courses taken in the semester. The credit point for a course is computed by multiplying the number of units for the course by the Grade Point Equivalent of the marks scored in the course.  Each course shall be graded out of maximum of 100 marks and assigned appropriate GPE as in Table 3.

 

 

Table 3: Grade Point Equivalent

(i)

Credit Units

(ii)

Percentage Scores

(iii)

Letter Grades

(iv)

Grade Points (GP)

(v)

Grade Point Average (GPA)

(vi)

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

(vii)

Class of Degree

Vary according to contact hours assigned to each course per week per semester, and according to load carried by students

 

70 – 100

 

 

 

60 – 69

 

 

 

50 – 59

 

 

45 – 49

 

0 – 44

 

 

A

 

 

 

B

 

 

 

C

 

 

D

 

F

 

5

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

3

 

 

2

 

0

Derived by multiplying (i) and (iv) and dividing by Total Credit Units

 

 

4.50 – 5.00

 

 

 

3.50 – 4.49

 

 

 

2.40 – 3.49

 

 

1.50 – 2.39

 

 

 

First Class

 

 

 

2nd Class Upper

 

 

 

2nd Class Lower

 

 

3rd Class

 

 

2.6       EVALUATION OF STUDENTS

2.6.1    Techniques of Student Assessment

(a)  Practical: By the nature of the disciplines in Engineering, laboratory practical are very important in the training of the graduates. To reflect this importance of practical work, a minimum of 9 hours per week (3 credits) should be spent on students’ laboratory practical. Furthermore, it is very important to determine performance of the student in the practical component of the programme. To achieve this, all the laboratory practical have been lumped together to form a course which the student must pass.  It is expected that the weighting given in the various courses is reflected in number and nature in the design of the experiments.  These practical must follow the trend in the current development of the programmes.

(b)  Tutorials: There should be one hour of tutorial for every four hours of lecture.  Thus a course of one credit unit should comprise 12 hours of lectures and three hours of tutorials.

(c)  Continuous Assessments: Continuous assessment shall be done through essays, tests, and practical exercises.

(i)         Scores from continuous assessment shall normally constitute 30 % of the final marks for courses which are primarily theoretical.

(ii)        For courses which are partly practical and partly theoretical, scores from continuous assessment shall constitute 50% of the final marks.

(iii)       For courses that are entirely practical, continuous assessment shall be based on a student’s practical work or reports and shall constitute 100 % of the final marks.

(d)Examinations:In addition to continuous assessment, final examinations shall normally be given for every course at the end of each semester. The basis for the final grade shall be as follows: Final Examination – 70%, Continuous assessment – 30% (Quizzes, Tutorials, Homework and Tests).                     

(i)         Each course shall normally be completed and examined at the end of the semester in which it is offered.

(ii)     A written examination shall normally last a minimum of one hour for one unit course, two hours for two unit course and three hours for three unit courses.

 

2.6.2    Moderation and Examiners

All question papers from 100 – 400 levels shall be moderated internally. The external examiner shall be used in the final year of the undergraduate programme (500 level) to assess final year courses and projects, and to certify the overall performance of the graduating students. 

 

2.6.3    Board of Examiners

The Head of any Department (HOD) shall be the Chief Examiner. There shall also be, in each Department, an appointed Examination Officer who will be responsible to the HOD. He will be in charge of the conduct of examinations and the recording and return of results for the respective Department. The Board of Examiners in each Department consist of all Academic staff

 

2.6.4    Course Advisers

There shall be appointed Course Adviser(s) who will be responsible to the HOD for each Department in the Faculty. The Course Adviser shall offer guidance and counselling services to students in their academic, social, personal and vocational life. He/she shall be responsible for the course registration of students, recording and returns of student’s sessional results and other duties as approved by the HOD.

 

2.6.5    SIWES Rating and Assessment

In engineering education, industrial attachment is very crucial.  The students are to proceed on eight weeks Students’ Work Experience Programme (SWEP) during long vacation at the end of second semester examinations in 100 and 200 levels. At the end of 300 level second semester examinations Students Work Experience Programme (10 weeks – long vacation); Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (24 weeks, one semester plus long vacation) is for all students at 400 level.

To make the training effective, it is important that the students learn how to operate some of the ordinary machines and tools they will encounter in the industry before they go for the attachment.  Therefore they should start with Student Work Experience Programme, which is conducted in the Faculty Workshops, under strict industrial conditions.  On successful completion of Students Work Experience Programme, the Students Industrial Work Experience Schemes can be done in industries under strict industrial conditions and supervision.

Normally, industrial attachment should be graded and no student should graduate without passing all the modules of the attachment and this shall be used in degree classification.

2.7       EXAMINATION IRREGULARITY, MISCONDUCT AND MALPRACTICE

Any of the following shall,prima facie, constitute examination irregularity, misconduct or malpractice in any Department in the Faculty of Engineering.

2.7.1    Irregularity

Irregularity shall be deemed to have occurred if the candidate sits for an examination for which he/she is not eligible, as may occur when the candidate:

  • Does not register for the approved course
  • Does not satisfy the attendance requirement of at least 70%
  • Has not complied with any other requirement(s) prescribed by the Senate, Faculty or Department.

Sanctions: Candidates whose positions are irregular as identified under this heading shall not be allowed to sit for the examination. Where the irregularity is discovered after the candidate might have sat for the examination, such paper(s) done under irregular conditions shall be nullified. 

2.7.2    Misconduct

Misconduct shall be deemed to have occurred under the following instances:

  • Failure to observe silence. The only permissible way for attracting the attention of the invigilator is by the candidate raising of his hand.
  • Smoking in the examination hall or rooms when an examination is in progress.
  • Act(s) of insubordination or insolence to the invigilator(s).
  • Fighting in the examination hall or rooms.
  • Act(s) of commission or omission that may negatively affect the smooth conduct of the examination.

Note: Gross misconduct shall be deemed to have occurred where there is evidence of membership in any secret cult of fraternal organization.

2.7.3    Malpractice

Examination malpractice shall be deemed to have occurred under the following:

  • Any act of omission which contravenes any of the provisions of section 3(2) of the Miscellaneous Offences Decree of 1984.
  • Any unlawful attempt, acts, omissions, successful or unsuccessful, directed at obtaining pre-knowledge of examination question(s) or influencing the marking of scripts or award of marks by the University or External Examiner.
  • Any attempts, successful or unsuccessful, to impersonate a candidate in any university examination. The following shall constitute impersonation:
    • Writing examination for a candidate
    • The exchange of examination number or names or answer scripts/sheets
    • The intentional use of someone else’s examination number.
  • Introduction of relevant foreign material(s) and cheat notes into the examination hall, whether used (copied from, consulted) or not. Relevant materials shall be taken to refer to any material that is considered to be relevant to the subject matter or course being examined irrespective of whether it is relevant to the specific examination question of the subject matter/course or not.
  • Exchange of relevant materials in the examination hall while examination is in progress. These material may involve any of the following:
    • Question paper containing relevant jottings and materials
    • Collaborated copying
    • Exchange of answer scripts
  • Any unlawful attempt, whether successful or unsuccessful, to:
    • Remove submitted examination answer script(s) or material(s).
    • Alter, add or delete any written material in the submitted answer script(s) or material(s) after the examination.
    • Replace submitted examination script(s) with extraneous one after the examination, either in part or in whole.
    • Submit manuscript not written under supervision in the examination hall during or after the examination.
    • Destroy submitted examination scripts/materials by fire or any other method.
  • Theft/removal of examination scripts/materials, whether used or not.
  • Consulting notes and other relevant materials outside the examination hall when such a candidate has not yet submitted his/her script(s).
  • Assisting, facilitating, aiding or abetting cheating.
  • Leaving the examination hall/room without permission and later returning to continue the examination.
  • Giving or receiving irregular assistance.
  • Non-submission or incomplete submission of answer scripts.
  • Uncollaborated copying or “giraffing”.
  • Writing on question papers/scripts, in spite of a written (as may be printed on front page of answer booklet) and/or any other than the examination booklet and sheets supplied by the University.
  • Speaking/conversation during the examination in spite of a warning.
  • Use and/or possession of unapproved electronic gadgets, such as mobile phones, for example, during the examination in spite of a warning.

Sanctions: Aside from expulsion or rustication, a candidate found guilty of any examination malpractice (i) to (p) above shall be punished by cancelling the relevant examination paper(s). Any candidate whose paper is cancelled shall be required to carry over the affected course(s).

2.8.      GENERAL STUDIES

2.8.1.   Goal

To produce a well-rounded morally and intellectually capable graduates with vision and entrepreneurial skills in an environment of peace and social cohesiveness.

2.8.2.   Objectives

The objectives of the General Studies programme consist of the following:

  • Acquisition, development and inculcation of the proper value-orientation for the survival of the individual and society.
  • The development of intellectual capacities of individuals to understand, appreciate and promote peaceful co-existence.
  • Producing graduates with broad knowledge of the Nigerian Nation and people with a view to inculcating in them mutual understanding and patriotism.
  • Exposing graduates of Nigerian Universities to the rudiments of ICT for computer literacy and ability to live usefully in this ICT age.
  • Preparing students for a post university life with opportunities for job creation and entrepreneurial skills.
  • Production of graduates capable of communicating effectively (both oral and written).

 

 

3. DEGREE PROGRAMME

3.1       Common Engineering Courses

In the first two years, all students in the Faculty of Engineering shall take common courses. The 200 level courses are foundation Engineering courses designed to expose students to the fundamentals of the Engineering discipline in a broad sense. Students can take 3 credits as electives from their programme of study.

It is believed that exposing engineeringstudents to the various aspects of the discipline in the first two years of their study, equips them with enough knowledge to determine their inclinations in terms of specialization at a later stage.

This view is further strengthened by the fact that an appreciable number of Engineering students have rural backgrounds which limit their perception of Engineering and the sub-disciplines therein.  It is believed that after the second year, the wide Engineering horizon would have been sufficiently illuminated for such students, who are now better placed, to make a choice. In addition, a broad-based programme at these foundation levels becomes an asset to its beneficiaries in the future when they are invariably required to play managerial, supervisory and/or executive roles in Engineering areas that may not be strictly their areas of specialization.

The general courses to be offered by the students in the Faculty of Engineering during their 100 and 200 Levels are presented below, subsequently, by the detailed course description.

 

100 Level

Course Code

Course Title

L

T

P

Course Credits (Units)

First Semester

 

 

 

 

CHM 111

General  Chemistry I

3

0

0

4

CHM 112

General chemistry practical I

0

0

1

1

PHY 111

General Physics I (Mechanics, Thermal Physics and Properties of matter)

3

0

0

3

PHY 119

Experimental Physics  I

0

0

1

1

MTH 111

Elementary  Mathematics I (Algebra and trigonometry)

3

0

0

3

MTH 112

Elementary  Mathematics II (Calculus)

3

0

0

3

CMP 111

Introduction to Computer Science

3

0

0

3

GST 111

Communication In English I

2

0

0

2

GST 112

Logic, Philosophy and Human Existence

2

0

0

2

GST 113

Nigerian People and Culture

2

0

0

2

GEE 111

Introduction to Engineering

1

0

0

1

 

            Total Units

 

25

Second  Semester

 

 

 

 

CHM 123

General  Chemistry II

3

0

0

4

CHM 124

General  chemistry practical II

0

0

1

1

PHY 121

General Physics II (Electricity, Magnetism and Modern Physics)

3

0

0

3

PHY 129

Experimental Physics  II

0

0

1

1

MTH 123

Elementary Mathematics III (Vector and Coordinate Geometry)

3

0

0

3

MTH 125

Elementary Mathematics IV (Statistics for Physical Sciences)

3

0

0

3

GST 121

Use of Library, Studies Skills and ICT

2

0

0

2

GST 122

Communication in English II

2

0

0

2

GST 123

History and Philosophy of Science

2

0

0

2

GEE 121

Basic Engineering Workshop

1

0

0

1

GEE 122

Student’s Work Experience Programme (SWEP)

 

 

 

0

 

            Total Units

 

21

Total Units (First & Second Semesters)

 

47

             

 

  

200 Level

Course Code

Course Title

L

T

P

Course Credits

First Semester

 

 

 

 

GEE 211

Basic Electrical Engineering           

3

 

 

3

GEE 212

Engineering Mechanics

3

 

 

3

GEE 214

Engineering Drawing

2

 

 

2

GEE 215

Workshop Practice     

2

 

6

2

GEE 216

 Computer and Computing

2

 

 

2

GEE 217

Engineering Mathematics I

3

 

 

3

ENT 211

Introduction to Entrepreneurial Studies I

1

 

 

1

GEE 231

Basic Electrical Eng. Practical

 

 

3

1

GEE 232

Engineering Mechanic Practical

 

 

3

1

Electives

 

 

 

 

GEE 213

Energy Efficiency and Waste Management

2

 

 

2

CHM 211

General Chemistry III

2

 

 

2

 

Total Unit

 

22

Second  Semester

 

 

 

 

 

GEE 221

IT in Engineering    

2

 

 

2

 

GEE 222

Materials Science

2

 

 

2

 

GEE 223

Engineering in society

1

 

 

1

 

GEE 224

Engineering Thermodynamics

2

 

 

2

 

GEE 225

Strength of Materials I

2

 

 

2

 

GEE 226

Engineering Mathematics II

3

 

 

3

 

ENT 221

Introduction to Entrepreneurial Studies II

1

 

 

1

 

GEE 241

Material Science and  Strength of Materials I  Practical

 

 

3

1

 

GEE 242

Fluid Mechanics I and Eng. Thermodynamics Practical

 

 

3

1

 

GST 221

Peace Studies &Conflict Resolution

2

 

 

2

 

GEE 299

Students’ Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) I

 

 

 

2

 

 

Total Unit

 

17

Total Units (First & Second Semesters)

 

41

 

 

3.1.2    Description

 

100 LEVEL COURSES

 

FIRST SEMESTER

 

CHM 111: General Chemistry I      (4 units)

Atomic theory and Nature of atoms: Dalton atomic theory, Modern concepts of atomic theory.  Contributions to atomic structure by Bohr, Thompson, Morseley and Rutherford.  Atomic abundances and isotopes. Introduction to the periodic table: properties and Electronic configuration. Stoichiometry: formulae and Equations,  Empirical and Molecular formulae. Calculations involving stoichiometry of reactions.  Volumetric analysis. Preparation of standard solutions, molarity and volumetric coefficient in neutralization, redox precipitation and complexation reactions. States of matter:Gases: Liquids and solids; Force of attraction in solids and liquids. Introduction to lattice structure. Isomorphism. Gas laws. General gas equations. Chemistry of elements in group 1, 2 and 3 (Their extraction, properties of their oxides and hydrides). Electrochemistry: Review of redox reactions, Balancing redox reactions in acid and alkaline media. Definition of Electrochemistry. Electrochemical cells, Electrode Potential and Cell Potential (study of the Standard Hydrogen Electrode). Half-cell notations and Chemistry of salt bridges. The Nernst equation. Chemical kinetics: Rate of chemical reaction. Rate laws and order of reactions. Activation energy and the Arrhenius Equation.  Chemical equilibrium: Le Chatelier’s principle (Effects of Temperature, Pressure and Volume).  Introduction to solution Chemistry: Definition of terms (Concentration of a solution and units of concentration). Types of solutions. Energy involved in formation of solutions. Solubility and solubility product, Dalton’s law of partial pressure; Henry’s law and its limitations). Solubility curves and applications. Introduction to nuclear reactions: Radioactivity. Properties of radiations. Radioactive decay and the decay series (of Uranim, Thorium and Actinium). Rate of radioactive decay, half-life (with calculations). Nuclear fission and fusion. Nuclear energy, mass defect and binding energy. Nuclear reactors. Application of radioactivity.

 

CHM 112: General Chemistry Practical I              (1 unit)

A selection of experimental exercises, designed to illustrate principles discussed in CHM 111 lectures which includes: making measurement, cations and anions, preparation of standard solutions, stoichiometry, volumetric analysis, redox titration.

 

MTH 111: Elementary Mathematics I (Algebra and Trigonometry)       (3 Units)

Elementary function of single real variable and their graphs, limits and the idea of continuity; graphs of simple functions polynomial, rational, trigonometric, etc. rate of change, tangent and normal to a curve; differentiation as limit of rate of change of elementary functions, product, quotient, function of function rules; implicit differentiation, differentiation of trigonometric, inverse trigonometric functions and of exponential functions; logarithmic and parametric differentiation; use of binomial expansion for any index; stationary values of simple functions: maxima, minima and points of inflexion, area of surface revolution; integration as an inverse of differentiation; integration of harder functions.; integration by substitution and by parts; definite integrals: volume of revolution, area of surface of revolution.


 

MTH 112:Elementary Mathematics II (Calculus)              (3 Units)

Functions of real variables, graphs, limits and idea of continuity, the derivative as a limit of rate of change, technique of differentiation, extreme curve sketching, integration as an inverse of differentiation, methods of integration, definite integration, applications to area and volumes.

CMP 111 Introduction to Computer Science         (3 Units)

History of computers. Functional components of computers. Characteristics of computers. Problem solving. Flow chart. Algorithms, computer programming and statements, symbolic names, array subscript, expression and control statements, data representation, the decimal system, binary system and number components. Introduction to basic and FORTRAN programming language, computer applications.

 

PHY 111: General Physics I (Mechanics, Thermal Physics,Waves and Optics) (3 units)

  • Mechanics:

Scalar and vectors: Addition and resolution of vectors, rectilinear motion and Newton’s law of motion. Inertial mass and gravitational mass; free fall; projectile motion; deflecting forces and circular motion. Newton’s law of gravitational satellites, escape velocity, gravitational potential, potential well; special case of circular motion. Momentum and the conservation of momentum. Work, power, energy; Units, potential energy for a gravitational field and elastic bodies, kinetic energy, conservation of energy, stored energy in a rotating body, kinetic energy in elastic and inelastic collisions.

  • Thermal Physics and Properties of Matter:

Temperature, heat, work, heat capacities second law, Carnot circle, thermodynamics, ideal gas temperature scale. Thermal conductivity; radiation; black body and energy spectrum, Stefan’s law. Kinetic model of a gas; equation of state, concept of diffusion, mean free path, molecular speeds, Avogadro’s number, behaviour of real gases.

A model for a solid: inter-particle forces in solids, liquids and gases; physical properties of solids.

Crystalline structure: close packing orderly arrangements, elastic deformation of an ordered structure; interference patterns and crystals.

Model for matter: surface energy and surface tension, plastic deformation; thermal and electrical proportions of metals.

Periodic motion of an oscillator: velocity and acceleration of a sinusoidal. Oscillator, equation of motion of a simple harmonic oscillator; damped oscillation; forced oscillation, resonance; propagation of longitudinal and transverse vibrations.

  • Waves and Optics:

Wave behaviour: Reflection of waves, stationary waves, propagated of straight and circular pulses; fibre optics, diffraction, refraction, dispersion, interference, coherence, polarization.

Wave and light: Mirrors, lenses, formation of images, lenses in contact, microscope, telescope; chromatic and spherical aberrations and their reduction, dispersion by prisms; relation between colour and wavelength; spectra.

 PHY 119:      Experimental Physics I         (1 Unit)

This introductory course emphasizes quantitative measurements, the treatment of measurement errors, and graphical analysis. At least six experiments from the following: use of metering instruments, viscosity, surface tension, oscillation about an equilibrium position, Hook’s law, moment of inertia, focal length of lenses, refractive index, optical instruments, the sonometer, heat capacity, volume expansion and latent heat as covered in PHY 111.       

 

GST 111: Communication in English I       (2 Units)

Effective communication and writing in English, Language skills, writing of essay answers, Comprehension, Sentence construction, Punctuation, Outlines and paragraphs, Collection and organization of materials, logical presentation.

 

GST 112: Logic, Philosophy & Human Existence             (2 Units)

A brief survey of the main branches of Philosophy Symbolic Logic Special symbols in symbolic Logic-conjunction, negation, affirmation, disjunction, equivalent and conditional statements law of tort. The method of deduction using rules of inference and bi-conditionals qualification theory. Types of discourse, Nature or arguments, Validity and soundness; Techniques for evaluating arguments; Distinction between inductive and deductive inferences; etc. (Illustrations will be taken from familiar texts, Including literature materials, Novels, Law reports and newspaper publications).

 

GST 113: Nigerian People and Culture      (2 Units)

Study of Nigerian history, culture and arts in pre-colonial times, Nigerian’s perception of his world, Culture areas of Nigeria and their characteristics, Evolution of Nigeria as a political unit, Indigene/settler phenomenon, Concepts of trade, Economic self-reliance, Social justice, Individual and national development, Norms and values, Negative attitudes and conducts (cultism and related vices), Re-orientation of moral Environmental problems.

 

GEE 111: Introduction to Engineering       (1 Unit)

Nature of Engineering : Discovering Engineering, What Makes an Engineer?, The Global and Societal Impact of Engineering ; Engineering & Society; Introduction to Engineering Design: The Design Process : The Design Process in Action; Connecting Science and Mathematics to Engineering: What Is the Role of Science and Mathematics in Engineering?, How Do Math and Science Connect with Engineering in High School andCollege?, Connecting Engineering Career Fields with Science and Engineering, Connecting Mathematics and Science to the Engineering Design Process

A Brief History of Engineering: Historical Themes, Engineering in Ancient Civilizations, Engineering in Medieval and Renaissance Europe, the Industrial Revolution, Rise of the Corporation, the Early Twentieth Century, Computer Age

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

CHM 123:  General Chemistry II                (4 Units)

Chemistry of Group 4, 5,6,7 , 8 and transition metals. Identification of organic compounds: General procedure for isolation and purification of organic compounds, Elemental (Qualitative) analysis. Quantitative analysis (Percentage composition, empirical formula and molecular formula. Shapes of organic molecules: Valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) theory and Hybridization. Types of organic reaction, homolytic  andheterolytic cleavage. Electrophiles and Nucleophiles. Inductive and resonance effects. Steric factors.   Chemistry of hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes and alkynes, alkyl halides and Grignard reagents, aromatic compounds): Nomenclature, preparation, physical properties, chemical properties and Applications. Introduction to petroleum coal tar chemistry: Origin. Importance. Fractional distillation of crude oil. Octane rating, Cracking and reforming.  Alcohols and phenols: Nomenclature and methods of preparation. Physical and chemical properties. Test for alcohols and phenols. Importance and uses/applications. Ketones and aldehydes: Structures and properties of aldehydes and ketones. Applications. Important methods of preparation. Chemical properties. Reactions with ammonia, hydrazine and derivatives. Tests for aldehydes and ketones. Carboxylic acid and derivatives:  Structure, Preparation, Physical and chemical properties.. Test for carboxylic acid. Chemistry and application of carboxylic acid derivatives like esters, acid halides, anhydrides, amides. Test for esters. Amines: Structure, Preparation. Physical and chemical properties. Test for amines. Application. Fats and oils: Definition and importance. Physical and chemical properties. Saponification. Chemistry of soaps and detergents. Application of fats and oil in paints and vanishes. Protein: Definition, importance, classification, special properties and reactions. Structures, isoelectric points, Test. Chemistry of Carbohydrates: Definition, importance, classification, special properties and reactions. Structures Polymers (natural and Synthetic).

 

CHM 124: General Chemistry Practical II (1 Unit)

A selection of experimental exercises, designed to illustrate principles discussed in CHM 124 lectures which includes: separation techniques (recrystallization, filtration), melting point determination, elemental analysis (Lassaignes sodium fusion test), functional group identification, synthesis of aspirin, preparation of soap.

 

PHY121:  General Physics II (Electricity, Magnetism and Modern Physics)      (3 Units)

Electrostatics,  Coulomb’s Law, Electric Field, Conductors, Electric Current, Ohm’s Law, Simple Circuit, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Capacitor and Capacitance. Magnetic Field and Induction, Electromagnetic Forces and Effects and Maxwell’s Laws, Atomic Structure, Models and Theory, X-Rays, Planck’s Quantum Theory, Duality of Matter, Structure and Composition of Nucleus.

 

PHY129: Experimental Physics II               (1 Units)

At least six experiments from the following: Potential difference and internal resistance of cells, use of potentiometer circuit; simple current measuring instruments. Planck’s constants and radioactivity.

 

GST 121: Studies, Skills and ICT    (2 Units)

Brief history of libraries, Library and education, University libraries and other types of libraries, Study skills (reference services). Types of library materials, using library resources including e-learning, e-materials; etc, Understanding library catalogues (card, OPAC, etc) and classification, Copyright and itsimplications, Database resources, Bibliographic citations and referencing. Development of modern ICT, Hardware technology Software technology, Input devices, Storage devices, Output devices, Communication and internet services, Word processing skills (typing, etc).

 

GST 122: Communication in English II     (2 Units)

Logical presentation of papers, Phonetics, Instruction on lexis, Art of public speaking and oral communication, Figures of speech, Précis, Report writing.

 

GST 123: History and  Philosophy of Science        (2 Units)

Man – his origin and nature, Man and his cosmic environment, Scientific methodology, Science and technology in the society and service of man, Renewable and non-renewable resources – man and his energy resources, Environmental effects of chemical plastics, Textiles, Wastes and other material, Chemical and radiochemical hazards. Introduction to the various areas of science and technology.  Elements of environmentalstudies.

 

MTH 123: Elementary Mathematics IIII (Vector, Coordinate and Geometry) (3 Units)

 

Types of vectors: points, line and relative vectors, geometrical representation of vectors in 1-3 dimension; addition of vectors and multiplication by a scalar; components of vectors in 1-3 dimensions; direction cosines; linear independence of vectors; point of division of a line; scalar and vector products of two vectors; simple applications; two dimensional coordinate geometry; straight lines, angle between two lines, distance between points; equation of circle, tangent and normal to a circle; properties of parabola ellipse, hyperbola straight lines and planes in space; direction cosines; angle between lines and between lines and planes, distance of a point from a plane.  Components of velocity and acceleration of a particle moving in a plane.  Force, momentum, laws of motion under gravity, projectiles, resisted vertical motion.  Angular momentum.  Simple harmonic motion, elastic string, simple pendulum, impulse.  Impact of two smooth sphere and of a sphere on a smooth surface.

 

MTH 125:      Elementary Mathematics IV (Statistics for Physical Sciences)      (3 Units)

Measure of location and dispersion in simply and group data. Exponential. Elements of probability distribution. Normal, binomial, Poisson, geometrics and negatives binomial distributions. Estimation and tests of hypothesis concerning the parameters of the distributions. Regression, correlation, and analysis of variable contingency table non-parametric inference.

 

GEE 121: Basic Engineering Workshops   (2 Units)

Drawing instruments and their uses, lettering, types and uses of lines, geometric construction (cones, cylinders, pyramids, cuboids) tangency, loci, orthographic projection, introduction to workshop measurements and tools, carpentry workshop, machine and tools, cutting, shaping and finishing of wood products, foundry workshop, moulding, metal cutting, shaping.  Electrical and Electronic workshop practices, instruments, appliances, trouble shooting and repairs.  Transformers, circuit components, soldering, introduction to battery charger, power supply unit, solar power system and electrical installations.  Introduction to building and drainage construction. Basic Instrument, implement and materials used in Civil Engineering construction site.  Composition of block, plaster, concrete and re-enforced concrete.  Curing of concrete.

 

GEE 122: Student’s Work Experience Programme (SWEP)       (0 Unit)

It is an eight week duration activities. During long vacation, students are engaged in practical engineering activities within the university environment to introduce them to some basic workshop practice and what they are likely to experience in higher levels. The activities are organized by technical staff under the supervision of academic staff.

200 LEVEL

FIRST SEMESTER

GEE 211: Basic Electrical Engineering                                          (3 Units)

  • Circuits – elements, DC and AC circuits, Basic circuit laws and theorems. Resonance in RLC circuits, power in AC circuits, measurement of voltage, current, power factors, power in circuits, 3-phase circuits.
  • Physics of devices – Discharge devices, semi-conductors materials, diodes and application
  • Transistor characteristics, devices and circuits
  • Electrical and electrical power measurements.

GEE 212: Engineering Mechanics              (3 Units)

 

  • Statics: Laws of statics, system of forces and their properties, Simple problems, Friction.
  • Particle dynamics – Kinematics of plane motion. Newton’s laws – Kinetics of particles, momentum and energy methods.
  • Kinematics of rigid body – velocity and acceleration diagrams for simple problems.Kinetics of rigid bodies – Two dimensional motion of rigid bodies, energy and momentum, kinetic energy in general plane motion, power in general plane motion, Mass, Moment of inertia, Simple problems, impulse, and moment of momentum, centre of pressure and percussion, frameworks, Simple harmonic motions.
  • Fluid Mechanics:Elements of fluid statics; density; pressure, surface tension, viscosity, compressibility etc.
  • Hydrostatic forces on submerged surfaces due to incompressible fluid.
  • Introduction to fluid dynamics – conservation laws.
  • Introduction to viscous flow.

GEE 213: Energy Efficiency and Waste Management     (2Units)

Definition, Domestic, Commercial and Industrial energy consumption and management. Green computing, Solar lamp, energy saving lamp, and power usage effectiveness. Building performance, energy-efficient landscaping, window insulation film and phase out of incandescent bulbs.Renewable energy for sustainable development with emphasis and practical demonstration on Solar, Wind and Hydro-Electric power generation as it relates to our environment. Waste management, Waste to wealth: Challenges and Prospect. Waste disposal, collection, removal and recycling.Experimental production of biogas within the University community.

 

GEE 214: Engineering Drawin (2 Units)

Use of drawing instruments, lettering, dimensioning, layout. Engineering graphics – Geometrical figures, comics, etc.  Graphical calculus and Applications. Development, intersection of curves and solids. Projections – lines, planes and simple solids.  Orthographic and isometric projections, simple examples Threaded fastness. Pictorial/Freehand Sketching. Conventional practices. Introduction to Computer graphics. AutoCAD: Getting Started with AutoCAD, Intermediate AutoCAD, Introduction to 3d Drafting, Advanced AutoCAD. Application of AutoCAD in Engineering Drawing, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical and other Engineering Designs.

GEE 215: Workshop Practice         (2 Units)

Elementary introduction to types and organization of engineering workshop covering jobbing, batch, mass production, and safety in workshop and general principles of working, bench work and fittings, hand tools, instruments, blacksmithing working principles, joint and fasteners, bolt, rivet, welding, brazing, soldering, carpentry, measurement and marking for uniformity, circulatory concentricity etc.  Electrical and Electronic workshop instruments and appliances.  Transformers, circuit components, soldering, design and construction of electrical and electronic devices such as battery charger, power supply unit, solar power system and electrical installations.  Introduction to Block moulding, composition, types and sizes of Blocks used in Building construction.  Concrete and its reinforcement, stages involved in Building construction.  Drainage Construction, Sewage disposal.

GEE 216 Computers and Computing         (3 Units)

Program design using pseudo-code/flowchart. Extensive examples and exercises in solving engineering problems using pseudo-code/flowchart. Computer programming using MATLAB. Familiarization with use of MATLAB tool box in simulating Engineering problems. Extensive examples and exercises in solving engineering problems using MATLAB. 

GEE 217: Engineering Mathematics I (3 Units)

Complex analysis – Elements of complex algebra, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions.  Real number, sequences and series.Vectors – Elements, differentiation and integration. Elements of linear algebra. Pre-requisite MTH 111

CHM 211: General Chemistry III   (2 Units)

Thermo Chemistry, electro-chemistry, kinetic theory, gas laws, transition in metals, introduction to organic and in-organic chemistry. Pre-requisite CHM 111

GEE 231: Basic Electrical Engineering Practical  (1 Unit)

A laboratory work in basic Electrical Engineering designed to illustrate topics covered in GEE 211.

GEE 232 Engineering Mechanic Practical             (1 Unit)

A laboratory work in Engineering Mechanics designed to illustrate topics covered in GEE 212

ENT 211: Introduction to Entrepreneurial Studies 1        (1 Unit)

 

The course introduces students to the definitions, functions, types and characteristics of entrepreneurship. This course further examines entrepreneurship and ethics, entrepreneurship theories and practice; new venture creation; forms of business, business opportunities, starting a new business, innovation, legal issues in business, insurance and environmental considerations, possible business opportunities in Nigeria and introduction to biographies of successful entrepreneurs etc.

SECOND SEMESTER

GEE 221: IT in Engineering            (2 Units)

Identification of PC parts and peripheral devices: functions, applications, and how to use them. Safety precautions and preventive maintenance of PC. Filing system: directory, sub-directory, file, path, and how to locate them. Word processing: principle of operation, applications, demonstrations, and practical hand-on exercises in word processing using a popular word processing package. Internet: available services, principle of operation, applications, demonstrations, and hand-on exercises in e-mail, and www. Spreadsheet: principle of operation, applications, demonstration, and practical hands-on exercises in use of spreadsheets to solve problems. Database Management package: principle of operation, applications, demonstrations and practical hands-on exercises in use of DBMS package in solving problems. Report Presentation Software Packages: principle of operation, applications, demonstrations, and practical hands-on exercises in use of a popular report presentation package (such as PowerPoint). Mini-project to test proficiency in use of software packages. 15hrs (Teaching & Demonstrations), 30hrs (Practicals)

GEE 222: Materials Science                         (2 Units)

Atomic and molecular structure, crystals, Metallic states, Defects in crystals, conductors, semi-conductors and insulators.

  • Alloy theory – Application to industrial alloys – steel in particular.
  • Engineering Properties – Their control, Hot and cold working, heat treatment, etc. Creep, fatigue and fracture. Corrosion and corrosion control.
  • Non-metallic materials – glass, rubber, concrete, plastics, wood and ceramics.
  • Elastic and plastic deformations: Defects in metals.

GEE 223: Engineering in society                 (1 Unit)

Philosophy of science, history of Engineering and Technology, safety in Engineering and introduction to risk analysis. The role of Engineers in Nations building, invited lectures from professionals.

GEE 224: Engineering Thermodynamics   (2 Units)

(i)      Basic concepts, definitions and laws.

(ii)     The ideal gas, Heat and Work.

  • The first Law of thermodynamics, applications to open and closed systems.
  • The steady State flow equation (Bernoulli’s Equation) and applications.
  • Second law of thermodynamics and Heat Cycles.
  • Energy: calculation of energy values: energy of heat, energy of flow of matter: Thermo-Mechanical energy, Chemical energy. Calculation of losses in open, steady state systems. Definition of energy efficiencies (apparatuses, plants), Visualization of energy losses and flows in diagrams: Property diagrams, energy flow diagrams (Grassmann-diagrams), value diagrams.

GEE 225: Strength of Materials I   (2 Units)

(i)      Force equilibrium – free body diagrams.

  • Concept of stress, strain; Tensile test. Young’s modulo and other strength factors.
  • Axially loaded bars, composite bars, temperature stresses and simple indeterminate problems. Hoop stresses in cylinders and rings.
  • Bending moment, shear force and axial force diagrams for simple cases, Simple torsion and application.

 

GEE 226: Engineering Mathematics II       (3 Units)

Calculus – Elementary differentiation, Relevant theorems. Differential equations – Exact Equations.  Methods for second order equations.  Partial differential equation.  Simple cases – Applications. Numerical Analysis – linear equations, non-linear equations. Finite difference operators:  Introduction to linear programming.

 

ENT 221: Introduction to Entrepreneurial Studies II (1 Unit)

This course is a continuation of ENT 211. It exposes the students to business idea generation, environmental scanning, new venture financing, financial planning and management, feasibility studies and business plan, staffing, business strategies, documentation/book-keeping, marketing, introduction of biographies of successful entrepreneurs, etc.

GEE 241: Material Science and Strength of Materials I Practical           (1 Unit)

A laboratory work on material science and strength of materials I designed to illustrate topics covered in GEE 222 and GEE 225


 

GEE 242: Engineering Thermodynamics Practical           (1 Unit)

A laboratory work onEngineering Thermodynamics designed to illustrate topics covered in GEE 224.

GST 221: Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution   (2 Units)

Basic concepts in peace studies and conflict resolution, Peace as vehicle of unity and development, Conflict issues, Types of conflicts, e.g.  Ethnic/religious/political/economic conflicts, Root causes of conflicts and violence in Africa, Indigene/settler phenomenon, Peace – building, Management of conflict and security. Elements of peace studies and conflict resolution, Developing a culture of peace, Peace mediation and peace-keeping, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), Dialogue/arbitration in conflict resolution, Role of international organizations in conflict resolution, e.g. ECOWAS, African Union, United Nations, etc.

 

GEE299: Students’ Industrial Work Scheme (SIWES)I   (2 Units)

Practices and skills in general engineering through instruction and operation of hand powered tools for wood and metal cutting and fabrication. Supervised hand on experience in safe usage of tools and machine for selected tasks. General practices on automobile repairs, survey, civil, electrical and other related engineering practice. (To take place on campus or off campus for at least eight weeks during long vacation).

 

4.2. Detailed course description, according to Department, for 300–500 Levels

 

Departments & Research