Department of English

PROGRAMME: B.A ENGLISH

PROGRAMME TITLE: BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A HONS) ENGLISH

 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAMME

PHILOSOPHY

The philosophy of the Department of English, Edo University, Iyamho is to produce graduates, who are equipped with broad and sound foundation of knowledge that will enable them function within the society, with their understanding of the dynamics of human societies and cultures and who places high value on the cultures of the people. 

 

OBJECTIVES

The Department aims to equipping the students with thorough knowledge of the English language and literature in English. The knowledge will enable the students, on graduating, to serve their country and humanity in general as teachers of English and literature in English or administrators in the public service and corporations.

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

ENG 111: ELEMENTARY ENGLISH SYNTAX

This course deals with the elements of a sentence considered from both syntactic and functional perspectives, the basic sentence patterns and the different kinds of concord. Emphasis will be on practice through exercises.

 

ENG 112: ENGLISH PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY 1

This course deals with the vowels and diphthongs in English with special reference to the Received Pronunciation (RP) version. Students will be introduced to the spoken medium of communication followed by the concept of phonemes and the description of the organs of speech. Phonetics sounds for various vowels and diphthongs will also be described.

 

ENG 113: INTRODUCTION TO PROSE FICTION

This course deals with the nature of prose fiction in relation to the nature of literature in general, elements and forms of prose fiction, principles of appreciation of prose fiction and a critical study of selected African and non-African novels and short stories.

 

ENG 114: INTRODUCTION TO POETRY

This course deals with the nature of poetry (definitions, elements, forms and functions) against the background of the nature of literature in general; critical appreciation of poetry (literary devices: imagistic figures, rhetorical figures, sound devices, rhythmical devices, and structural devices); the study of African and non-African poems.

 

ENG 115: ENGLISH COMPOSITION I

This course deals with the kinds of composition, Narrative, descriptive, expository and argumentative compositions. There will be emphasis on how to write a good introduction, body paragraphs and conclusion for each of these kinds of compositions. Attention will also be paid to paragraph linking (coherence). Correct use of language and factual information.

 

ENG 121: ELEMENTARY ENGLISH SYNTAX II

This course deals with the special characteristics of the following sentence constituents; the verb phrase; nouns, pronouns and the basic noun phrase. Emphasis will be on practice through exercise.

 

SOC 111: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY I AND II

The course provides an introductory analysis and description of social structure and dynamics of human society, field of Sociology; Sociology and other Social Sciences, basic concepts and principles of Sociology, the relations between individuals and groups and how humans are assisted to fit into the society from infancy. The role of groups and organization such as the workplace is studied.

 


 

ISD 111: INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

This course introduces students to the basic concept in international relations such as national interests, sovereignty, power, balance of power, foreign policy etc. It also exposes students to the subfields of international relations: international security, international political economy, international relations theory, international organizations and international law.

 

ISD 212: INTRODUCTION TO THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

This course presents the importance of theoretical perspectives and debates in the study of international relations. It covers studies that address different levels of analysis from the international system to domestic politics to individual leaders and that span major theoretical paradigms, including Realism, Liberalism and Constructivism, discussions on intellectual history as well as cutting-edge contributions to the field.

 

ENG 122: ENGLISH PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY II

This course is a continuation of ENG 112 but with specific reference to the consonants and consonant clusters. Speech organs will be studied in relation to the production of consonants. These consonants will be classified in accordance with their places and manner of articulation. Phonetic transcription will be used and practiced intensively in words and phrases that are made up of both vowels and consonants.

ENG 123: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA

This course is focused on the nature of drama and on its various elements, forms and artistic features. Students will be introduced to the theory of drama beginning with Aristotle’s poetics. Selected African and non-African plays will be studied in detail.

 

ENG 124: INTRODUCTION TO ORAL LITERATURE

This course deals with the nature of oral literature and its relationship with folklore. The course also introduces the students to the developments in the study of folklore/oral literature in Europe and other parts of the world. The characteristics features, forms and functions of oral literature in general will be studied.

 

ENG 125: ENGLISH COMPOSITION I

This course is a continuation of ENG 115. Emphasis will be on how to make an outline (parts, sections, aspects of the object to be described) and other rudiments of compositional writing.

 

SOC 121: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 

The course teaches the relationship between the functioning of social systems and the behaviour and attitude of individuals. The reasons why individuals behave in particular way is exhaustively examined.

 

ISD 121: EVOLUTION OF CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM:

This course examines the evolution of the contemporary international system by exploring how relationships of power have evolved and changed as the contemporary international system began from the structure of regional systems. It uses the notion of empire (the Roman Empire before 1648) to divulge the changing nature of order, power and of power relations in the system. This allows both the lecturer(s) and students to view international relations as a thick set of social, political, cultural and military relations, offering a variety of viewpoints that are habitually hidden/unnoticed by concentrating basically on the international system as one of sovereign states. The course uses the relationship between empire and the evolution of concepts such as region, sovereignty and hegemony. It further looks at the relationship between empire and conflict, pointing in particular at the twentieth century. The course also reflects the supposed departure and reappearance of empire in the contemporary period, giving us the clout to reflect in conclusion on the usefulness of the concept in the contemporary world politics.

 

ISD 222: NIGERIAN FOREIGN SERVICE AND DIPLOMACY

This course examines the meaning, origin and development of Nigeria’s Foreign Service. It looks into its roles, problems and prospects in the changing Nigerian environment; the Nigerian ambassador and his tasks; and career Vs Non-Career Diplomats.

 

ENG 211:  INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH SYNTAX I

Here, the focus is on adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and associated phrase types. Attention is paid to the use of complex sentence, co-ordination and apposition.

 

ENG 212: ENGLISH PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY III

This course starts with establishing the distinction between phonetics and phonology and then proceeds to deal with the following aspects of English phonology, phonemes, allophones, suprasegmental (intonations, stress, pitch, juncture),phonotactics of English sound (sequencing co-occurrence of sounds).

ENG 213: ADVANCED COMPOSITION IN ENGLISH

This course deals with more specialized composition writing consisting of report writing, minutes of meetings, long essays, feature articles, writing for magazines, proposal writing etc. Attention will be paid to correct language use and other technical matters connected with these kinds of writing.

 

ENG214: SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE

The course discusses the background issues in the development of English literature. As a survey course it highlights the major historical processes that go back to the Celtic occupation of the Island, through centuries of Anglo-Saxon occupation, Roman Empire rulership, the Norsemen, the Scandinavians, leading up to the Norman conquests. It will establish the link between English literature and the history behind the development of England as a geo-political entity. It begins its survey from non-written sources, through the early accounts of conversions to Christianity, through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Neoclassical/Augustan Age, Victorian Ages and terminates at the modern period. 

 

ENG215: COMMONWEALTH LITERATURE

The course identifies the commonwealth organization as an international structure that has brought together former colonialists and their former colonies on a platform of supposed equal relationship as independent nations. It however establishes that the colonial encounter itself brought about a cultural and social interface in which established norms and values became models of interactions across national boundaries. The clear link between cultural valves and literary developments becomes the guiding principles in the course as it seeks to unravel the connectivity between the social processes and the human person. The impact of emerging philosophies on the overall development of the human character is a key issue as the course takes us through the writing of major authors in key commonwealth countries across a broad spectrum of world literatures: England, Canada, Nigeria, India, Kenya, Pakistan, South Africa, Ghana etc.

 

ENG 216: INTRODUCTION TO MODERN AFRICAN LITERATURE

This course deals with the general definition and description of African literature; the concept of African literature written in English, socio-cultural and historical background to modern African literature and the study of some African poems, novels and plays in English from various selected regions of Africa.

 

SOC 214/225 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

This course would focus on socialisation; social learning, internationalization, and conscience formation, values and attitudes; prejudice and discrimination; stereotypes; development and change of attitudes; social movements.

 

ENG221: INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH SYNTAX II

This course would focus on the in-depth examination of adjuncts, disjuncts and conjuncts; the verb and its complementation; and the complex noun phrase. As usual, textual examples and practice exercises will be provided.

 

ENG 222: ENGLISH MORPHOLOGY

This course deals with English word structure which includes the nature and types of morphemes; affixation (derivational and inflectional); phonological and syntactic influences on affixation.

 

ENG 223: THE LANGUAGE OF LITERATURE

This course focuses on the various dimensions of the use of English in literary writing (poetry, fictional prose, drama). Emphasis is placed on textual analysis of the linguistic features and the varieties of language and style used in the different genres of English literary canons, particularly British, American and Canadian.

 

ENG 224: ELIZABETHAN DRAMA

This course focuses on the development of the Elizabethan drama including the evolution of the stage from Thomas kyd and Christopher Marlowe through Shakespeare and Ben Johnson. Emphasis will be laid on the technical and thematic preoccupation of the Elizabethan dramatists. Selections from Shakespeare will form the core of the course although texts will be selected from his contemporaries.

 

ENG 225: SURVEY OF AFRICAN ORAL LITERATURE

The course provides a detailed survey and classification of African oral literature. The course also deals with the nature, characteristic, features, artistic elements, functions, performance, language and the oral artist. Students will be introduced to current methods of collection and preservation of African literature and critical study of selected texts.

 

ENG 226: 17TH CENTURY LITERATURE

This course introduces the students to the thought and literature of English between 1600 and 1700. It entails a careful examination of the religious, philosophical and scientific ideas which define the literary sensibilities of the period. Special attention is paid to metaphysical poetry within the context of Jacobean and Caroline literature. The following authors will form the core of the course, john Milton, John Donne, Ben Johnson, Andrew Marvell and George Herbert. These are supplemented with selections from the political, religious and philosophical works of Thomas Hobbes, Francis Bacon, Lancelot Andrews, Robert Burton, and Thomas Brown.

 

ENG 311: ENGLISH DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

This course first examines the concept of discourse analysis. It is followed by a consideration of the internal and external features of discourse as well as a comparison of such terms as utterance/ sentence cohesion and coherence. Discouse processing follows in order to discover the texture of any discourse, using such notions as schema, exchange, proposition/locutions, reference (phoric relations), pragmatics (illocutions, perlocutions and implicatures). Finally, the course considers the use of linguistic forms to realize speech acts/ language functions and the pre-conditions for any communicative act. Examples will be drawn from non-literary texts.

 

ENG 312: VARIETIES OF ENGLISH 

The course first considers the concept of a language variety paying attention to key words in the definition: subset, formal, substantial, feature, correlate, socio-situational. It then examines the concept of language community, nothing the criteria for the establishment of such communities. The dialectalisation of a language is reviewed. The course then details and discusses the two main kinds of language variety the products of dialectalisation dialects and diatypes/ registers. The concept of situation as well as the situational variables and the condition the occurrence of linguistic features in situation will be discussed. Finally, the analysis of the language of situation-types will be conducted.

 

ISD 312: CONTEMPORARY STRATEGIC STUDIES

This course covers strategic thinking from Carl Von Clausewitz to the 21st century. Importance will be given to the relationship between force and international politics including the role of strategy in limiting international competition and attempts to restrain the use of force. The course begins by introducing a number of key enduring themes, concepts and problems associated with strategic studies before it considers the relevance of these considerations to the contemporary international security environment.

 

ENG 313: THE SOCIOLINGUISTIC OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

This course focuses on English usage in English-speaking speech communities, attitudes to usage, the notion of “correctness” and “grammaticalness”, and the problems of defining “Standard English” worldwide. The course also highlights the forms, functions, and identities of specific world English, particularly those belonging to the so-called “inner” and “outer” circle of English.

 

ENG 314: ENGLISH PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY IV

This course assumes the knowledge of elements of English Phonetics and Phonology already covered in the first three courses in the series. It focuses on the use of phonetic skills and oral communication. In addition to this, and more specifically, it deals with pronunciation problems which speakers of Nigerian languages are likely to encounter in the study or use of RP, using linguistic approaches as contrastive analysis and error analysis.

SUMMARY OF COURSES

100 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

GST 111

Communication in English I

2

GST 112

Logic, Philosophy and Human Existence

2

GST 113

Nigerian Peoples and Culture

2

ENG 111

 Elementary English Syntax 1

2

ENG 112

English Phonetics and Phonology 1

3

ENG 113

Introduction to Prose Fiction

3

ENG 114

Introduction to Poetry

3

ENG 115

English Composition 1

2

Elective Courses (students are required to register and pass any one of the following electives)

CSC 112

Essentials of Programming

2

SOC 111

Introduction to Sociology

3

ISD 111

Introduction to International Studies/Relations

3

 

Total

21/22

       

 

100 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

GST 121

Use of library, studies skills and ICT

2

GST 122

Communication in English II

2

GST 123

History and philosophy of science

2

ENG 121

Elementary English Syntax 11

2

ENG 122

English Phonetics and Phonology 11

3

ENG 123

Introduction to Drama

3

ENG 124

Introduction to Oral Literature

3

ENG 125

English Composition 11

2

Elective Courses (students are required to register and pass any one of the following electives)

CSC 122

Introduction to Software Packages

3

SOC 121

Introduction to sociology II

3

ISD 121

Evolution of Contemporary International System

3

                                                Total

       19

 

 

 

 

 

 

200 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

ENT 211

Introduction to Entrepreneurial Studies I

1

ENG 211

International English Syntax 1

3

ENG 212

English Phonetics and Phonology 111

3

ENG 213

Advanced Composition in English

3

ENG 214

Survey of English Literature

3

ENG 215

Commonwealth Literature

3

ENG 216

Introduction to Modern African Literature

3

                                                Total

19

200 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

ENT 221

  Introduction to Entrepreneurial Studies II

1

ENG 221

 Intermediate English Syntax 11

3

ENG 222

 English Morphology

3

ENG 223

The Language of Literature

3

ENG 224

 Elizabethan Drama

3

ENG 225

 Survey of African Oral Literature

                       3

ENG 226

    17th Century Literature

                       3

                                                Total

19

 

300 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

ENT 311

Entrepreneurial Skills I

2

ENG 311

English Discourse Analysis

3

ENG 312

Varieties of English

2

ENG 313

The Sociolinguistic of the English Language

2

ENG 314

   English Phonetics and Phonology IV

3

ENG 315

   Children’s Literature and Adolescent Fiction

3

ENG 316

African Prose Fiction

3

ENG 317

American Literature

3

ENG 318

Gender Studies

2

 

                              Total

       23

300 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

ENT 321

Entrepreneurial Skills II

2

ENG 321

Theories of Syntax

3

ENG 322

English for Business Communication

3

ENG 323

English for Mass Communication

2

ENG 324

Language and Style in African Literature in English

2

ENG 325

English Romantic Poetry

3

ENG 326

Modern African Drama

3

ENG 327

 Major Genres of African Oral Literature

3

ENG 328

  Creative Writing

3

                                                            Total

24

 

400 LEVEL FIRST SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

ENT 411

Entrepreneurship Development I

1

ENG 411

 English Semantics

3

ENG 412

The English Language in Nigeria

3

ENG 413

Victorian Literature

3

ENG 414

Modern African Poetry

3

ENG 415

Literary Theory and Criticism

3

ENG 416

African American and Caribbean Literature

3

ENG 417

Bibliography and Research Method

2

                                                Total

          21

 

400 LEVEL SECOND SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE TITLE

UNITS

ENT 421

Entrepreneurship Development

1

ENG 421

History of English Language

3

ENG 422

English Stylistics

3

ENG 423

20th Century British Literature

3

ENG 424

World Literature in Translation

3

ENG 430

Research Project

6

                                                Total

19

 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Candidates for a four-year programme must possess a Senior Secondary Certificate or WASC/NECO or GCE or its requirement with at least five Credit passes which should include English Language, Mathematics, Literature in English  and any two art subjects from the following Government, Economics, Geography, Commerce, or  at least five merit-level passes in the Teacher Grade II (TC II)  examinations or its recognized equivalent, which must be obtained in not more than two sittings of the specified examinations.

The requirements for admission into the three-year degree programme (direct entry) are:

  1. As specified for the four year programme plus passes in at least two subjects at the GCE (A/L) or HSC including one art subject OR
  2. At least NCE merit passes in TWO teaching subjects plus THREE OTHER CREDIT PASSES in GCE (O/L) or WASC/NECO. These subjects must include English Language, Mathematics and Literature in English in not more than two sittings OR
  3. At least a credit pass at the Diploma in Theatre (DTA) or its equivalent plus five credit passes which must include English Language and Mathematics in GCE or WASC/NECO obtained at not more than two sittings OR
  4. At least a B+ average in related fields in a National Diploma (ND) Certificate plus five credit passes which must include English Language, Mathematics and Literature in GCE or WASC/NECO obtained in not more than two sittings OR
  5. An HND in any social science subject.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To graduate, a four-year degree student must have:

  • Completed and passed the following number of credit units at each level stated as follows:

100 – 44

200 – 39

300 – 47

400 – 40

That is a total maximum number of 170 credit units including all compulsory courses specified by the university and department, the minimum is 166 credits units. For the direct entry or three year degree student, to graduate, the maximum is 137 credit units, including all compulsory courses specified by the University and Department. In any one semester, a minimum of 19 and maximum of 24 credits units may be registered for the students.

Departments & Research